top of page
  • Instagram
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • YouTube
  • TikTok

Houseplants Thrive with Our Innovative Watering System

This illustrates the use of an automatic watering system for plants. The receiver is placed in the potting soil receives the output of the water reservoir. The water is transferred from the receiver to the houseplants by wicking action. In this case, the water supply is from a watering globe. Water for the houseplant may also be supplied by another type of reservoir, a re-purposed bottle for example. The requirement is that the output tube fit into the receiver thus making an automatic watering system for plants. Note that the water distribution is automatic but adjustable via the wicks supplied with the houseplant watering kit. Also, the plant watering system receiver can be placed anywhere in the pot. The plant on the left is a Croton. The plant on the right is a Polyscias (Ming Auralia).jpg

Croton: Codiaeum variegatum 'Petra"

This illustrates the use of an automatic watering system for houseplants. The hydrator is placed in the potting soil and receives the output of the water reservoir. The water is transferred from the hydrator to the houseplants by wicking action. In this case, the water supply is from a watering globe. Water for the houseplant may also be supplied by another type of reservoir, a re-purposed bottle for example. The requirement is that the output tube fit into the hydrator thus making an automatic watering system for plants. Note that the water distribution is automatic but adjustable via the wicks supplied with the houseplant watering kit. Also, the plant watering system hydrator can be placed anywhere in the pot.
This shows a close-up of the distributor and wicks emerging from it. It is the central element of the automatic watering system for houseplants. The hydrator is placed in the potting soil and receives the output of a water reservoir. The water is transferred from the hydrator to the houseplants by wicking action. In this case, the water supply is from a watering globe. Water for the houseplant may also be supplied by another type of reservoir, a re-purposed bottle for example. The requirement is that the output tube fit into the hydrator thus making an automatic watering system for houseplants. Note that the water distribution is automatic but adjustable via the wicks supplied with the houseplant watering kit. The plant watering system hydrator can be placed anywhere in the pot.

Hydrator and wicks

Patented: U.S. #11570957

Automatic Watering for Your House Plants

 

  • The watering rate is determined by the wicks, not by the planting medium, reservoir or hydrator

  • Unlike other passive devices, the hydrator watering rate can be changed easily - without re-potting

  • You can use an empty wine bottle as a reservoir, giving much longer watering times vs a watering globe

  • Once set up, watering your plants is simple - just refill the reservoir

  • Reservoirs can be refilled or changed readily - just fill with water or swap them, no fuss, no bother

  • You can use a decorative reservoir daily, and change to a higher capacity one when traveling

  • Watering your plants is automatic -> less water stress on your plants from lack of attention

  • Because of the extension on the bottom of the hydrator, the reservoir is more stable than if placed directly in the planting medium, dramatically reducing sagging

  • The water is distributed over a greater area by the wicks verses globes, terra cotta stakes or drippers

  • Hydrators can be placed anywhere within the pot & still provide more uniform watering across the pot.

  • The pictures above show a higher capacity long neck glass bottle reservoir - such as an oil, wine or other beverage bottle (the bottle's neck only needs to fit down to the inside bottom of the Hydrator for stability)

  • To see products and order, click on Shop

Comparisons with other approaches to plant watering:

Other Approach            Limitations of that Approach

Watering can, etc.     Must have someone to water manually; Cannot be done automatically; Prone to spills &                                                            overflows; Not usually consistent - more dependent on attendant's schedule & dependability, since                                        watering is required frequently for non-succulent plants

                                             

Water globe alone    Watering rate cannot be controlled - depends on the porosity of plant growth medium & often                                                empties too quickly, especially with a porous growth medium; Can also become clogged with a                                             denser medium; Globe often sags to one side because of poor support from the moist growth                                                medium; Limited capacity of the globes limits the time the plants can be left unattended; The water                                      enters the plant pot at one location - causing less even water distribution

                                            

Wicks entering the    Limited watering capacity, since most saucers are shallow; Difficult to see how much water remains    pot from the              remains; Often leads to longer term saturation of the plant medium with water, leading to sepsis          bottom (saucer)         and killing the plant's roots; Watering rate cannot be controlled, except by changing wicks, which                                            enter through the bottom of the pot - requiring re-potting

                                                

Terra Cotta or            Watering rate cannot be controlled - it depends on the porosity and size of the receptacle;

other porous             The water enters the plant pot at one location - causing less even water distribution; If the water

receptacle                  source is "hard" (having dissolved calcium), the pores will gradually clog up, reducing                   

                                   flow; They are usually expensive

                                             

Drip emitter               {Adjustable rate drip emitter attached to the top of a reservoir such as a drink bottle, inverted  and                                         inserted into the plant medium}; The watering rate will decrease in use, since the height of water in                                        the bottle reduces as it empties and the water pressure reduces, until the bottle is refilled; The                                                water enters the pot at one location - causing less even water distribution

                                             

Separate container    Takes up space and is unsightly due to the tubes or wicks leading to the plants; The tubes can slip with tubes or wicks    out of the house plant pot, causing spills; The water usually enters the pot at one location - causing to water the plants    less even water distribution; The tubes, that work by siphoning, do not provide adjustable flow rates

                                                

Powered pump          [Container outside the plant pot that transfers water by small tubes or wicks to the plant pot];

                                    Takes up space and is unsightly due to the tubes or wicks leading to the plants; The tubes can slip                                          out of the house plant pot, causing spills; The water usually enters the pot at one location - causing                                        less even water distribution; Separate system needed for each group of plants; Expensive

image.png
image.png

FAQ: How can I adjust the watering rate for my plants? Because water distribution is controlled by the wicks, the rate can be changed to accommodate the needs of the plant(s) by changing the number (or size) of the wicks. If water comes out of the drainage holes in the bottom of the pot, try removing one wick at a time. You can test this by pulling up a wick from the planting medium (easily done since the wicks are near the top surface of the soil), rinsing it off and stuffing it into the hydrator where it will no longer be in contact with the potting soil. If the watering rate is now more appropriate, you can remove that wick completely by untying it or cutting it off at the retainer or just leaving it in the hydrator.

If, on the other hand, the plant is not getting enough water, you can add a wick or substitute a larger wick. Polyester or acrylic yarn makes good wick material because they do not decay in the soil and come in a variety of thicknesses.

     For more information about the product, its advantages, use, or to order, click the following links: Operation, Succulents, About, Shop, Hydrator Product Page, Contact, FAQ, Installation, Terns and Conditions, Support.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn

CONTACT US

1631 University Drive; Richardson, TX 75081

214-412-0169

bottom of page