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Vergrowth Products offers an automatic system for watering houseplants that fits in the pot.  It allows flow rate and distribution adjustment for each plant.

This illustrates the use of an automatic watering system for plants. The receiver is placed in the potting soil receives the output of the water reservoir. The water is transferred from the receiver to the houseplants by wicking action. In this case, the water supply is from a watering globe. Water for the houseplant may also be supplied by another type of reservoir, a re-purposed bottle for example. The requirement is that the output tube fit into the receiver thus making an automatic watering system for plants. Note that the water distribution is automatic but adjustable via the wicks supplied with the houseplant watering kit. Also, the plant watering system receiver can be placed anywhere in the pot. The plant on the left is a Croton. The plant on the right is a Polyscias (Ming Auralia).jpg
This illustrates the use of an automatic watering system for houseplants. The receiver is placed in the potting soil receives the output of the water reservoir. The water is transferred from the receiver to the houseplants by wicking action. In this case, the water supply is from a watering globe. Water for the houseplant may also be supplied by another type of reservoir, a re-purposed bottle for example. The requirement is that the output tube fit into the receiver thus making an automatic watering system for plants. Note that the water distribution is automatic but adjustable via the wicks supplied with the houseplant watering kit. Also, the plant watering system receiver can be placed anywhere in the pot. The plant is an Aspragus Fern.jpg
This shows a close-up of the distributor and wicks emerging from it. It is the central element of the automatic watering system for houseplants. The receiver is placed in the potting soil and receives the output of a water reservoir. The water is transferred from the receiver to the houseplants by wicking action. In this case, the water supply is from a watering globe. Water for the houseplant may also be supplied by another type of reservoir, a re-purposed bottle for example. The requirement is that the output tube fit into the receiver thus making an automatic watering system for houseplants. Note that the water distribution is automatic but adjustable via the wicks supplied with the houseplant watering kit. The plant watering system receiver can be placed anywhere in the pot. This plant (not shown) is a Crassula.jpg

     Watering globes have been available for years. They were originally presented as a means of providing unattended house plant watering. However, many users have been dissatisfied with their performance, since the water discharge rate cannot be controlled. With a porous plant growth medium, the water discharge rate is too great, leading to over watering and premature emptying of the globe. The globe by itself is often not stable, having a narrow stem inserted into the potting soil that is then moistened by the water - all the while supporting the heavier part of the globe suspended above the pot. The globe tends to lean over as a result. The solution to these problems is found in the Vergrowth receiver (Patent Pending).  It is so called because it receives the output of the watering globe or other reservoir and distributes it to the plants by wicks. It overcomes both of these problems and others encountered in automatic watering of house plants.

      Because the water is distributed by wicks from a separate, removable reservoir the flow rate can be controlled easily. The wicks are easily accessible from the top of the pot (unlike some systems that have wicks entering from the bottom of the pot). The number and placement of the wicks can be changed easily to adjust the watering rate. Also, a reservoir of larger volume can be exchanged for the regular one to provide automatic watering of your house plants for prolonged periods. You can have a decorative reservoir for normal use and swap it out for a larger capacity one when away for an extended period of time - providing for consistent watering for your house plants.  Upon return, you can then easily swap for the decorative reservoir without having to disturb the plant growth medium or change the watering rate.  For complete illustrated use instructions, click the Installation tab above. 

   The operation, advantages and flexibility of this automatic house plant watering device are explained in detail on the Operation page - see the tab at the top of this page.

FAQ: How can I adjust the watering rate for my plants? Because water distribution is controlled by the wicks, the rate can be changed to accommodate the needs of the plant(s) by changing the number (or size) of the wicks. If water comes out of the drainage holes in the bottom of the pot, try removing a wick at a time. You can test this by pulling up a wick (easily done since they are near the top surface of the soil), rinsing it off and stuffing it into the receiver where it will no longer be in contact with the potting soil. If the watering rate is now more appropriate, you can remove that wick completely by untying it or cutting it off at the retainer. If the plant is not getting enough water, you can add a wick or substitute a larger wick. Polyester yarn makes good wick material because it does not decay in the soil and comes in a variety of thicknesses.

Asparagus Fern: Asparagus aethiopicus

Receiver

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1631 University Drive; Richardson, TX 75081

214-412-0169